I've long planned to start a Home Automation series in an attempt to document the deployment, configuration and monitoring of various home automation components. This journey really started over a year ago when my wife and I built our house. With network drops run to anywhere that I thought we might ever want to put anything, I saw home automation as a valid excuse to apply my passion for technology outside of work and get back to some of my more "maker" roots.

I really had a few goals that I was trying to accomplish. Energy conservation and trending were at the top of that list. I've always assumed that solar panels were in our future at some point, but without knowing what our true energy usage was, or where we were wasting energy were the first two problems to solve before considering solar in order to ensure we could right-size a solar deployment and cover a large percentage of our average energy use.

Secondary to the energy monitoring was the security and comfort side of home automation. Lighting presets, more granular control over HVAC, sunrise/sunset rules, presence driven rules, etc. were all things I was excited to learn more about and develop over time.

I've been reliably using OctoPrint on a Pine64 since I wrote the original two parts (Part 1Part 2) of this series back in January. I was a bit behind on OctoPrint updates (running 1.3.2), and took the opportunity this weekend to upgrade to the latest stable version (1.3.4), and add in the custom action I've been meaning to create for remotely powering up my 3D printer.

I've been using a Ubiquiti Networks mPower-Mini to control power to my 3D printer since day one. In addition to providing remote on/off capabilities, these devices also allow you to track and trend power consumption and other metrics. Ubiquiti has unfortunately ended development of the mFi controller, but these devices are still manufactured for users willing to script their own interface to them. I've been working my way off of my existing mFi controller for this reason, and figured it was time to connect my mFi switch to an action inside of OctoPrint. This allows OctoPrint to issue the on/off commands directly to the outlet, without needing to login to the mFi controller, portal, or mobile app.