Trending & Analyzing SmartThings Devices (Part 1 of 4)

Back in the Home Automation Kickoff post, I talked about the power of the mFi Controller to record, trend, and analyze device and energy usage. One of the huge disappointments with Ubiquiti ending development of the mFi Controller was the end of development related to these capabilities. SmartThings has proven itself to be a fantastic platform for the integration and management of physical devices, but offers essentially no analytics around those devices. In this post, and the following series, we’ll look at integrating data analysis with SmartThings, and building a more data-driven home automation solution.

I've been reliably using OctoPrint on a Pine64 since I wrote the original two parts (Part 1Part 2) of this series back in January. I was a bit behind on OctoPrint updates (running 1.3.2), and took the opportunity this weekend to upgrade to the latest stable version (1.3.4), and add in the custom action I've been meaning to create for remotely powering up my 3D printer.

I've been using a Ubiquiti Networks mPower-Mini to control power to my 3D printer since day one. In addition to providing remote on/off capabilities, these devices also allow you to track and trend power consumption and other metrics. Ubiquiti has unfortunately ended development of the mFi controller, but these devices are still manufactured for users willing to script their own interface to them. I've been working my way off of my existing mFi controller for this reason, and figured it was time to connect my mFi switch to an action inside of OctoPrint. This allows OctoPrint to issue the on/off commands directly to the outlet, without needing to login to the mFi controller, portal, or mobile app.

Picking up where Part 1 left off, it's not time to look at how to install and configure OctoPrint on the Pine 64, setup webcam streaming to OctoPrint, and make our first print!

I had a couple Pine64 boards sitting in a drawer, and decided it was finally time to replace that old Raspberry Pi running OctoPrint (err, OctoPi) for my 3D printer. The Raspberry Pi has served admirably, but it was definitely time for an upgrade, and a chance to improve a lot of my overall printing workflow.